Search Results for "genetics"

Everything to Know about DHT and Hair Loss

 

If you are battling male pattern baldness, Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) is enemy number one. DHT is a sex steroid present in the body and is a derivative of testosterone. It is, quite simply, the hormone behind male hair loss. Let’s examine its characteristics, and then discuss ways to mitigate its effects.

DHT and hair loss facts:

  • DHT is a male sex hormone known as an androgen. Androgens give males their masculine characteristics, such as a deep voice, facial and body hair, and greater muscle mass.
  • DHT plays a vital role in the development of male gender characteristics during fetal development and puberty.
  • DHT also attaches itself to the dermal papillas (hair root), altering the gens of the follicle and causes miniaturization of the follicle. Hairs become finer and finer. Eventually the follicle falls out in the natural hair cycle, but is not replaced by a new robust follicle, resulting in permanent hair loss.
  • The hair on the back and sides of a man’s head is much less susceptible to DHT, resulting in the classic male pattern baldness hair loss at the top of the scalp and crown.
  • The amount of testosterone or DHT does not cause baldness. Rather, it is the sensitivity of the follicles to the DHT that determines the extent of hair loss. That sensitivity is caused by genetics. In other words, it runs in the family, but can skip generations and also brothers and cousins within the same generation.
  • Balding at the crown caused by DHT has also been linked to increased risk of prostate cancer, according to the Harvard Medical School.

If you are a man experiencing hair loss, one thing is for sure: you are not alone. By age 50 over half of all men in the U.S. will experience some hair loss due to DHT.

Halting DHT and hair loss:

If you are losing your hair, don’t despair. There are ways to block DHT and to even reverse hair loss.

  • Finasteride (often sold under the names (Propecia® or Proscar®) can reduce the production of DHT by up to 70% and is the only DHT inhibitor approved by the FDA.
  • There are other medical treatments like minoxidil, low level laser light therapy, platelet rich plasma treatments, and ketoconazole shampoo. These do not lower or block DHT but they can slow the progression of hair loss.
  • An FUE hair transplant can restore hair to areas where it is thinning or lost. FUE stands for Follicular Unit Extraction. It is a modern, minimally invasive, outpatient procedure that is virtually painless and leaves no linear scar. The hair follicles are removed from the donor site (such as the back or sides of the head), then transplanted hair-by-hair to the thinning or bald area. The procedure usually takes one day, and the result is 100% natural, permanent and undetectable.

It’s okay if you’re not okay with going bald—there are ways to address your DHT and hair loss.

Contact my clinic for a consultation or ask me a question about your unique situation and how we might treat it. 


Dr. James Harris is an internationally renowned hair transplant surgeon, inventor of patented follicular unit extraction technology, published author in the field of hair restoration and an advocate for patient care. He is currently at the forefront of research and development in the field of hair cloning. Learn more about Dr. Harris or read rave reviews from his patients.

 


Can you really stop hair shedding?

 

Every man and woman who comes to my clinic is concerned about hair loss. It can be quite demoralizing to see your precious hair strands literally go down the drain. But it is quite normal to lose some hair daily, whether or not you suffer from male pattern baldness or female pattern baldness. So what is “normal” shedding, and can you stop hair shedding altogether?

Some hair shedding is normal
The average adult person has approximately 100,000 hairs on their head. Every day approximately 80-100 hairs are shed, whether a person is experiencing advanced hair loss or no hair loss at all. These strands of hair often end up in a comb or brush, your pillow, or in the shower drain. For those suffering hair loss, this can be very alarming, but it is actually completely normal, because hair grows in cycles. Each cycle last between four and seven years, and consist of phases, called the anagen, catagen and telogen phase, as illustrated in this image below. 

In people who are not experiencing hair loss, the anagen phase begins the cycle anew once the old hair follicle is shed. So in that sense, shedding hair is normal, natural, and you should not try to stop your hair from shedding. 

Stages of Hair Growth

 

Even if you did try to stop your hair from shedding, you would not succeed, because the old hair follicle will be released from the scalp to make way for the new one regardless of shampoos, conditioners, potions, pollutants, or any other substance or factor. There is an entire cottage industry devoted to selling people products that prevent hair from shedding. Some are even reputable companies. But please, don’t buy it, neither literally nor figuratively.

But hair shedding is causing me to go bald!
I realize that this can be distressing, but it’s actually not the shedding that is causing your hair loss, it’s the lack of new growth in the anagen phase. The follicles naturally fall out, but a new one either grows back finer/thinner or does not grow back in, which results in true hair loss over time. This lack of new growth can have a number of causes, but in general you can blame genetics. Learn more about the causes of hair loss in women and the causes of hair loss in men

You can’t stop hair shedding but you may be able to stop your hair loss
Fortunately, many scientific advances have been made in recent years that can result in successfully halting or even reversing hair loss. Learn more about how to keep the hair you have through preventative medical interventions such as Rogaine, or how a follicular unit hair transplant can effectively move follicles from a place where many robust hairs still exist (like the back of your head) to the thinning areas. 

Please note that if you are losing hair in clumps or in a dramatic or accelerated fashion, the facts in this post do not apply to your situation, and you should seek medical attention immediately. Hormonal imbalances, anemia, thyroid problems, severe illness, crash dieting or a scarring skin condition can also cause increased hair loss. These topics are also outside the scope of this post, and medical attention should be sought.)

Contact my clinic for a consultation or ask me a question about your unique situation and how we might treat it. 


Dr. James Harris is an internationally renowned hair transplant surgeon, inventor of patented follicular unit extraction technology, published author in the field of hair restoration and an advocate for patient care. Learn more about Dr. Harris or read rave reviews from his patients.


First my husband, now me: why women lose hair.

We see a lot of women at the Hair Sciences Center, which is not really surprising. Why women lose hair is a topic of great concern. While male pattern baldness is a very visible and well known phenomenon, women are nearly as likely to suffer thinning hair by the time they reach their 50’s. Many of these women watched their husbands struggle with hair loss, sometimes starting in their 20s. First there was recession at the temples, then the bald spot appeared. These women have seen firsthand the aging effects of hair loss, but when it begins to happen to them it’s often startling, demoralizing, and in advanced stages, devastating. Much more than a bundle of fibers, hair is an expression of your style, personality, sensuality, sex appeal, and your youth. It’s no wonder that prospect of losing hair is so fraught with emotion.

What is “normal” hair loss?
A head of hair is comprised of approximately 100,000 strands. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, most adults lose between 50 to 100 strands of hair each day. This sounds alarming in and of itself, until you consider that those strands are all replaced with new growth, in a continuous cycle. However, when hair begins to thin, the lost hair is not replaced at the same rate. In women, this is known as female pattern baldness.

What is female pattern baldness?
Female pattern baldness is a somewhat misleading name for hair loss as it generally occurs in women, which does not tend to create “patterns” like the receding temples and balding at the crown that characterizes male pattern baldness. By contrast, hair loss in women occurs most frequently at the center of the scalp, and can progress to include the entire top of the scalp, behind the frontal hairline. It is generally most visible where the hair parts in the middle. The Ludwig Classification System describes hair loss patterns in female pattern baldness, which ranges from stages I to III. This is a simplified illustration: 

Ludwig Scale

What’s at the root of your hair loss?
There are many causes of hair loss in women, ranging from stress and diet to hormones and genetics. If hair loss seems dramatic, it is highly advisable to get tested for thyroid problems, anemia, vitamin deficiencies, or other health issues. If it is falling out in clumps or patches, you may have a rare syndrome known as alopecia areata, in which your immune system attacks healthy hair follicles by “mistake.” This is an alarming but usually reversible condition. Other causes include hormone changes from the birth control pill, or drugs used to treat high blood pressure, heart disease arthritis and depression. Chemo and radiation therapy to treat cancer can cause complete hair loss, but the will grow back once treatment concludes. Wearing hair in styles such as corn rows, braids, or tightly pulled pony tails can also cause permanent hair loss called “traction alopecia,” and should be avoided at all times. Wearing hair extensions can also pull on the hair causing permanent loss. Starvation diets, severe emotional distress and extreme stress such as from a major surgery can all contribute to hair loss.

Is female hair loss measurable?
In a word, yes. If you are experiencing gradual, all-over thinning it may be time to get a Hair Check®. A patented new device measures the area of a bundle of hair in a specific scalp area and provides a number, the Hair Mass Index. This number can be compared from one year to the next with great accuracy. Measurements are made in three specific areas of the scalp and the index values are recorded to compare against future measurements in the same locations. 

OK but what can I do?
The first step to halting or reversing female hair loss is to schedule a consultation with Dr. Harris. He will help determine the cause and recommend a treatment course. The good news is that there are many avenues available to women, starting with the Hair Survival Program, which helps you keep the hair you have. Furthermore, you may be a candidate for a female hair transplant.

Contact my clinic for a consultation or ask me a question about your unique situation and how we might treat it. 

 


Dr. James A. Harris is an internationally renowned hair transplant surgeon, inventor of patented follicular unit extraction technology, published author in the field of hair restoration and an advocate for patient care. Learn more about Dr. Harris or read rave reviews from his patients.

 

 

 


Causes of Hair Loss in Men

Causes of hair loss in men

Do you find yourself looking in the mirror for signs of hair loss? Have you been dismayed to see your hair receding at the temples and forehead? Is the spot on your crown widening by the year? Do you feel as though your baldness is making you appear old before your time? Have your self-confidence and sex appeal been impacted? If this sounds familiar, and the situation is causing you distress, you have come to the right place. Dr. Harris is a leading authority and internationally renowned expert on hair restoration for men, and he can help. Schedule a consultation with him today.

HSC Researches causes of hair loss in men

What are the causes of hair loss in men?

In short, the most common cause of baldness in men is a genetic predisposition called androgenetic alopecia. It is a condition whereby the affected follicles are sensitive to a hormone called dihydrotestosterone type II. There are other causes of hair loss in men, including:

  • Genetics

  • Male Hormones

  • Medical Conditions

  • Injuries

Sometimes hair loss can be caused by underlying medical conditions, so it is important that men be evaluated by a physician. If clinically appropriate, the following processes should be considered:

  • Anemia
  • Thyroid Disease
  • Connective Tissue Disease
  • Hormonal Imbalances
  • Vitamin Deficiencies
  • Emotional Stress
  • Autoimmune Skin Diseases (scarring alopecias) 

It is also important to review the use of medications that can cause hair loss, such as beta-blockers, Vitamin A, thyroid drugs, coumadin and prednisone. The following laboratory tests are often useful if underlying problems are suspected: CBC, Chem Screen, ANA, T4, TSH, Androstenedione, DHEASulfate, Total and Free Testosterone.

Why are some men not candidates for hair restoration surgery?

Hair transplantation involves the movement of hair from an area of greater density and fullness (usually the back and sides of the scalp) to an area of hair loss in the front, top or crown. Men who lack sufficient hair in a harvest region are not strong candidates for transplantation procedures. Dr. Harris will evaluate the “strength” of the donor by a method called “densitometry” to evaluate your candidacy. You may also want to understand where you are on the Norwood Scale.

If you are considering hair restoration, as in all surgical procedures, it is important to balance the potential gain against the possible risks when making a decision to go forward with the treatment. 

Dr. James Harris is a leading authority and internationally renowned expert on the causes of hair loss in men, and hair transplant surgery for men. He lectures to hair transplant surgeons around the globe regarding best practices, including Asia, South America, Europe and the U.S.A.  View Dr. Harris’ curriculum vitae or schedule a consultation with him today.

 


Causes of Hair Loss in Women

Causes of hair loss in women

Are you alarmed to realize that your hair is thinning? Do you find yourself checking the shower drain and your hairbrush for evidence of hair loss, and fretting at the site of every strand? Perhaps you have taken to wearing different hairstyles or hats to conceal your hair loss. If this sounds familiar, and the situation is causing you distress, you need not feel alone. Dr. Harris is a leading authority and internationally renowned expert on hair restoration for women, and he can help.

How common is hair loss in women?

Actually, it occurs quite often. Although it is not as common as in men, it can affect over one in four women. Some women experience general thinning while others have a pattern of temple recessions.

What causes hair loss in women?

There are many hair loss causes, including:

  • Genetics
  • Medical Conditions
  • Injuries
  • Surgical procedures and aesthetic procedures (such as face or brow lifts)
  • Wearing very tight hairstyles such as cornrows that exert a constant pull on the hair (traction alopecia)

Many women are born with high hairlines or develop temple recessions. These women are excellent candidates for transplantation. Schedule a consultation with Dr. Harris to discuss your unique circumstances.

Because some hair loss in women can be caused by underlying medical conditions, it is important that women be evaluated by a physician. If clinically appropriate, the following processes should be considered:

  • Anemia
  • Thyroid Disease
  • Connective Tissue Disease
  • Gynecological Conditions
  • Hormonal Imbalances
  • Vitamin Deficiencies
  • Emotional Stress

It is also important to review the use of medications that can cause hair loss, such as oral contraceptives, beta-blockers, Vitamin A, thyroid drugs, coumadin and prednisone. The following laboratory tests are often useful if underlying problems are suspected: CBC, Chem Screen, ANA, T4, TSH, Androstenedione, DHEASulfate, Total and Free Testosterone.

Why are some women not candidates for hair restoration surgery?

Hair transplantation surgery involves the movement of hair from an area of greater density and fullness (usually the back of the scalp) to an area of hair loss in the front, top or crown. Women who have generalized thinning (Diffuse Unpatterned Alopecia) have hair that is thin all over the head, and it may not be beneficial to transplant hair that has been weakened by the balding process.

When hair is removed from a part of the scalp that is in the process of thinning, there is a risk that some of the hair that is weak will not regrow in its new location. There is also the possibility that the hair in the recipient area is more fragile and some or all of the original hair in this area may be lost. This process is called telogen effluvium and when it occurs, it is usually reversible in a three to six month time frame. Also, when the donor area continues to thin, then the transplanted hair will also thin over time, since it came from the same area. Dr. Harris will evaluate the “strength” of the donor by a method called “densitometry” to evaluate your candidacy.

In hair transplantation, as in all surgical procedures, it is important to balance the potential gain against the possible risks when making a decision to go forward with the treatment.

Furthermore, before deciding if a hair transplant is right for you, Dr. Harris will also evaluate whether you are a good candidate for non-surgical hair restoration therapies for women. Learn more about hair loss products and your options by visiting our Hair Survival Program tailored for women.

Dr. Harris is a leading authority and internationally renowned expert on hair restoration for women. Ask him a question >or schedule a personal consultation.


HSC in the Media

HSC in the media

Television Appearances

HSC’s Dr. James Harris recently discussed FUE advances on the TV show, “The Doctors.”

 

Denver’s Channel 7 News reports on Dr. Harris performing the world’s first FUE transplant utilizing the ARTAS® robot.

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Recent Awards

Dr. Harris is awarded the Golden Follicle Award, honoring one physician from around the globe for “outstanding and significant clinical contributions” to hair restoration surgery. Dr. Harris is known not only for his groundbreaking research, innovations and inventions in the field of hair restoration, but he is known for his generosity in sharing of his knowledge with other physicians the world over.

Videos Featuring Dr. James Harris:

“Is there a cure for baldness?”

“What causes male pattern baldness?”

The tool developed by Dr. James Harris is being used around the world, and was recently featured on Extra TV.

 

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